Tag Archives: picture book

Bagel in Love

10 Feb

 

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Bagel in Love

written by Natasha Wing

illustrated by Helen Dardik

published by Sterling Publishing, 2018

Just in time for Valentine’s Day!

Sweet tale of rejection, acceptance, and finally love. Bagel gets the brush-off from all the bakery pastries. He gets treated like day old bread by everyone from Doughnut to Pretzel and everyone in between. He feels totally crummy. His dreams of tap-dancing like Fred Eclair are dashed, until he meets a tempting little tap-dancing cupcake. They make a tasty pair winning the dance contest and each other’s hearts.

Oh, did I mention puns? You figured that out, huh? Between the  flat out rejection from the Matzo to the icing on the cake, you’ll be happy you found this scrumptious treat.

And hungry? Don’t get me started… had to search Pinterest for some yummy valentine pastries. Which is your favorite? Send me your recipes!

 

Sure, and if this isn’t enough… there’s glitter! The cover art and final page is fancy, sparkly, shimmery heaven for glitter junkies!

How I Got My Agent

5 May

 

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I am so thrilled to finally have this story to tell! It’s the one every writer yearns to tell. It’s the one that’s unique to every writer.

This one is mine.

After three years of writing and submitting to agents, I finally broke through the barrier. You know, the one between being someone who writes and being a writer with an agent.

I did a lot of the usual things aspiring authors do. I joined SCBWI. I continue to go to monthly meetings. I have attended several state and regional conferences and workshops.  I took online classes and webinars. I started three different critique groups specifically for picture book writers, two of which are still active. I joined several online writing groups. I became an administrator in one of those groups, the Debut Picture Book Study Group. I am active on several social media sites.  I purchased and devoured how-to books. And I got to know my local librarians and bookstore owners on a personal basis. I read, read, read picture books.

In short, I did everything I could to learn the craft.

And of course, I did my best to write good stories and submit to agents who were taking on new clients in my genre.

But I also did my best to make connections in the writing community. It was one of these fortunate connections which ultimately led to signing with my agent, Tina Schwartz of The Purcell Agency. I met Tina during a webinar on Writing Queries. We hit it off right away and I began working as her Literary Assistant. Tina was interested in my work. The first story I subbed to her was rejected, but the second pitch was a hit! She called me on Wednesday morning and made a verbal offer of representation. We spoke for a long time and she emailed a standard contract. Luckily for me, my son is an attorney so I emailed the contract to him for a quick look-see and an explanation of some terms of ‘legalese’.

The very next day I was on my way to Chicago for a writing conference. I was so crazy over the moon I could barely stay in my lane! My friend and critique partner (and passenger) was almost as excited as I was. And being the sweetheart that she is, she reread every single workshop and discussion offered as I drove  pondering which alternate sessions to attend in light of my new circumstances. We memorized the names of agents/agencies and editors/publishing houses we wanted to meet that weekend. I’m so happy we had decided to take the shoulder days on the conference. This extra evening gave me the opportunity to better prepare myself without feeling rushed the morning of the conference with new concerns in addition to a 5 hour drive. Then we focused on having fun and learning as much as we could. It was actually a nice reprieve from the constant preoccupation of possible representation. If my brain wasn’t overstimulated before the conference, it certainly was afterwards.

In the meantime, my son had redlined the contract with a few suggestions and I made a list of questions, questions, and more questions I wanted to ask Tina. (Remember those shoulder days? We stayed Sunday evening, had dinner with new friends and didn’t head home until Monday morning.) Monday, I relaxed, reviewed notes, discussed it with my son and husband and I called her on Tuesday morning with my inquires. We spoke for almost an hour, something I appreciate in an agent. She was very patient with me and answered all my questions and concerns. We negotiated the terms of the contract, and Tina re-mailed it on the spot. I printed it out. Signed. Returned a scanned copy. And celebrated!

Now, Wednesday again. One week after the initial phone call, Tina emailed me again. She has sent my manuscript to five publishing houses, houses I would not have been able to get into without an agent.

Unreal! I’m still pinching myself!

 

 

 

 

 

Groundhog’s Dilemma

19 Jan

25508197 Groundhog’s Dilemma

written by Kristen Remenar

illustrated by Matt Faulker

Charlesbridge, 2015

 

Groundhog has one job. And he does it well. Every year on his special day, Groundhog leaves his home and checks the weather. If he sees his shadow there will be six more weeks of winter, if he doesn’t there will be an early spring. Every year Groundhog’s friends gather around to hear his weather prediction. Every year, half of them are happy and the other half are not. But Groundhog calls it like he sees it.  Then one year his friends each decide to try to influence his prediction with gifts and bribes.

No celebration of Groundhog’s Day would be complete without Groundhog’s prediction. Every kid (around here at least) wants to know if he should trade in his sled for a skateboard or if he should leave out his hats and mittens for another six weeks.

Can the groundhog really predict the weather? How will Groundhog keep all his friends happy. A little dose of honesty goes a long way, and Groundhog learns that calling it like he sees it has its advantages.

This is Kristen Remenar’s first picture book and her husband, Matt Faulker’s thirty-ninth picture book. Together they have produced a pretty good one here. Like Groundhog says, “I just call it like I see it”!

Maggie and Michael Get Dressed

14 Jan

 

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Maggie and Michael Get Dressed

written and illustrated by Denise Fleming

Henry Hold and Company

April, 2016

 

What’s not to love? A boy and his dog, morning routine, and colors! Denise Fleming has done it again, created funny endearing characters while skillfully infusing preschool life-lessons like making choices and self sufficiency.

Even a two year old can tell you that socks belong on your feet not in your mouth, but Maggie loves to chew things. Maggie is a good sport though and allows Michael to dress her before he dresses himself. And I bet no one is surprised that Maggie is found chewing on something when Michael gets home.

I was lucky enough to score an Advanced Reader Edition this week when my friend and critique partner returned from the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards in Boston. Michael and Maggie will be available to everyone in April this year. I’m sure it will quickly become another Fleming classic!

 

Babies Ruin Everything

14 Jan

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Babies Ruin Everything

written by Matthew Swanson

illustrated by Robbi Behr

Imprint, Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group

July, 2016

 

Swanson and Behr are co-creators of over sixty books and their lives together which include their three children. Their depiction of a less than enamored sibling is a comical twist on the traditional ‘I’m a big sister now’ story. The mischievous protagonist with a genuine conflict gives new meaning to the word brotherhood. Definitely not your sweet run of the mill story, but you’re going to love this feisty little girl who calls it like it is!

Big Sister is upset when her baby brother arrives. Her whole life is turned upside down and no one seems to care. The baby has overtaken her room and even her club. He doesn’t know how to act at parties, stand on one foot, or throw a frisbee. Then she starts to see the value of having a baby brother. She begins by teaching him everything she knows and together they manipulate their parents into submission.

I read an Advanced Reader’s Edition. Get in line now to pick up your own copy this summer!

Bridging the Generations

14 Nov

When writing for children, especially picture books, we need to remember the adult as well. We’ve often heard, it’s the adults who are the gatekeepers to children’s literature. Will they read this book repeatedly? Will they purchase this book? Today I want to add one more, Will they find themselves in this book? Today I did just that.

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Little Tree is a book about holding on and letting go. It’s a book about facing an unknown future. It’s a book about growing up.

It’s written for children. It’s written for adults. I’ll bet, it’s written for you.

For a summary of the story and suggested activities for Little Tree look HERE.

I met Loren Long, author and illustrator of Little Tree this morning. He was kind and giving with his audience. He shared his story of a little tree with us. It’s a story of watching his firstborn embark on his school career. Not once, but twice. He retold how frightening those experiences were for him as a parent watching his son go off to kindergarten… and then to college. And, we got to meet his son the college student and inspiration for the story, and see what a wonderful relationship they have and watch them work together on a piece of art for the bookstore.

 

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Here’s a picture of Loren sharing my favorite page:

“As his last leaf floated to the ground, for the first time Little Tree felt the harsh cold of winter.”

The artwork is stunning. And the text reminds me that when you finally let go of something that’s been holding you back, it can be cold and scary. But in the end, you know you that in order to grow… you must first let go.

Think back to the times it was hard for your little ones to let go… let go of their binky, let go of diapers, let go of their afternoon naps, let go of your hand in the school parking lot. It was a cold and scary time for them. You were there to dry their tears, give them comfort, help them through it.

And think of the times it was hard for you to let go and watch them grow. I think about the times when they fell and scraped their knees, when they boarded their first school bus, when they wanted to be dropped off at the mall without me, when they got their hearts broken for the first time, when they moved out of town. It really did feel like a harsh cold winter. I thought my heart was dying. But each time they came back to me taller and stronger… more of who they were and less of who I was. And it felt good.

See, what I mean about writing across generations? Loren Long has done that beautifully. I hope you pick up a copy for yourselves and feel the splendor of letting go as a wonderful thing.

 

 

 

Flashlight

12 Dec

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Flashlight written and illustrated by Lizi Boyd (2014)

One night, a boy takes his flashlight camping with him. After reading a book in his tent, the boy goes outside in the dark. As he walks, he shines the light on the many things hiding in the darkness all around him. He sees a boot lying in the grass, bats flying in the air, mice in the grass, an owl in the tree, skunks behind a tree, sticks in the pond, and a beaver in the dam. The farther he goes into the woods, the more his flashlight reveals to him. At one point, the boy stumbles on a rock and his flashlight is picked up by a raccoon. As all the other animals look on, the raccoon shines the light on the boy. The other animals each take a turn shining the light on the boy. Bit by bit, the boy is revealed to the animals. Eventually the light is shone on the boy’s tent. He returns to the tent and his book, and a family of mice hold the flashlight for him so he can read.

Lizi Boyd tells this story without words and with loads of imaginative, fun, light/dark artwork. In addition to the flashlight illuminating the story as it unfolds, there are tiny peepholes on each page foreshadowing the next page.

I can’t wait to share this picture book with a very inquisitive and not-sleepy granddaughter at bedtime. I know she’ll love exploring this little boy’s environment from the darkness of her own bedroom.

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