Snow Dog, Go Dog

51XAeRo50cL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_Title: Snow Dog, Go Dog

Author: Deborah Heiligman

Illustrator: Tim Bowers

Publisher: Two Lions

Year: 2013

Word Count: 188

Story Element #9 RHYME   Rhyme seems pretty straightforward, but when you look deeper you find all kinds of rhymes. There are perfect rhymes (cat/hat) and near perfect (home/none) rhymes. There are half rhymes (bent/end) and identical rhymes (son/sun). Rhymes can come anywhere in the text too.  Internal rhymes are on stressed syllables within a phrase. (Hey Jude, don’t make it bad. Take a sad song and make it better.) While ending rhymes are on the last syllable of a line or phrase (There was an old woman who lived in a shoe. She had so many children she didn’t know what to do.) Many writes use beginning rhyme/alliteration (Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum

Snow Dog, Go Dog uses perfect internal rhymes with the same last word on each line. But what makes it even more fun to read aloud is the rhythm of the lines. The author, uses three lines per page with triple internal rhymes. Let’s take a look at the first page.

Tinka is a play dog.

yay dog.

a loves -to-romp-all-day dog.

Take a look at the illustrations… They seem to follow the same rhythm as the text!SnowDogGoDog_IN01_large._V371341856_Kids and adults will enjoy reading and rereading this book many times.

If you enjoyed this one, check out two earlier books written and illustrated by the Heiligam-Bowers duo Fun Dog, Sun Dog (2005) and Cool Dog, School Dog (2009).

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8 Responses to “Snow Dog, Go Dog”

  1. Linda E.H. February 28, 2015 at 6:04 PM #

    I like books with these kind of rhyme schemes. So much fun to read aloud.

    Like

    • Juliana Lee February 28, 2015 at 10:24 PM #

      It is terrific! You can tell it’s written to be a read-aloud.

      Like

  2. SevenAcreSky February 24, 2015 at 6:06 PM #

    A good one Juliana. Love rhyme, and this sounds like a romping run on fun. Thanks for the review.

    Like

    • Juliana Lee February 24, 2015 at 7:13 PM #

      ‘Romping run on fun’? You’re quite the poet yourself!

      Like

  3. ManjuBeth February 22, 2015 at 12:22 PM #

    I like seeing how the rhyme threads through the series. Thanks!

    Like

    • Juliana Lee February 22, 2015 at 4:47 PM #

      Thanks, I enjoyed it too! It’s a non-tradtional rhyme and I like it! 🙂

      Like

  4. thelogonauts February 22, 2015 at 10:49 AM #

    What an adorable little book! Love this as a way to teach kids about different kinds of rhymes than just end rhyme. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    • Juliana Lee February 22, 2015 at 4:48 PM #

      I agree. There are more than enough examples of perfect end rhymes, this one is unique. 🙂

      Like

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